OilandGasHelp.com

I happen to be looking for the location of a specific Northwest Savings Bank in PA and when I pulled up their website I found the below link.

http://www.oilandgashelp.com/

It looks like Northwest Savings Bank has put together a section of their website to answer questions or help folks who are considering leases. The “Oil and Gas Resources” section has some interesting info available. At the very least, another resource for those who like to have all the facts before they make decisions.

What has Matt Baker done to protect Pennsylvania from the negative impacts of the current underregulated gas rush?

Below is a letter written to the Wellsboro Gazette. Voting day is coming up quickly and here is an opportunity for those of us who are unhappy with the decisions Matt Baker has been making in regards to the gas rush. The fact that Matt Baker has not had, and will not otherwise, have anyone running against him again means he can be extremely wishy-washy on this subject as well as others. At this point he doesn’t have to take any position and can play all sides in his favor without actually having to be educated about the subjects economic, environmental or health issues that are arising. AND, if he has made an effort to educate himself about them on his own (not from the oil and gas industry spokespersons) then he is truly more interested in selling out to a huge industry that is already bloated with money and getting fatter off our resources.  Please read the letter if you are curious or are concerned that you are not being fairly represented by your local representative.

For those who haven't seen my letter in the Wellsboro Gazette.

I would really like to get the Democratic nomination by write
in since otherwise I need to collect nearly 500 signatures to get
on the ballot in November.

 http://www.tiogapublishing.com/articles/2010/04/29/opinion/letters/doc4bd8a0836c297146754097.txt

Why me?

Published: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 4:15 PM CDT
To the editor;

Why am I, a registered Green, asking Democrats to write me
in as their candidate for state representative on May 18?
In a nutshell, to keep Matt Baker from once again running as
a Democrat as well as a Republican. But if you want an issue,
how about the upcoming devastation of much of the state?

What has Matt Baker done to protect Pennsylvania from the
negative impacts of the current underregulated gas rush?
Despite ample evidence of problems from places like Texas,
Colorado and Wyoming, as well as Dimock, Hickory, Bradford,
Waterville and Fall Brook right here in Pennsylvania, Mr Baker
continues peddling industry’s pipe dreams that we’re all going
to be millionaires and that there is nothing to worry about.
He and every other elected official from County Commissioner to
President have not just let us down but sold us out to a
rapacious industry. Who should decide whether Tioga County
is turned into an industrial sacrifice zone, gas industry
executives or the people who live here?

I am not so naive as to expect to derail Mr. Baker’s well
oiled political machine, but I do believe that if enough
voters, both Republican and Democrat, made the effort to write
me in, he might be reminded that he is supposed to represent the
people rather than rich and powerful corporations.

John Kesich

Millerton

What PA residents think of Range Resources

Here is some excellent video of the meeting with range Resources that took place in Washington County, PA today. Thanks txSharon!

http://txsharon.blogspot.com/2010/04/7-videos-what-pa-residents-thinks-of.html

DEP finally waking up

PA Must Take Action to Protect Water Resources from Drilling Wastewater, Other Sources of TDS Pollution

Proposed Rules will Help Keep Drinking Water, Streams and Rivers Clean

HARRISBURG — High levels of total dissolved solids pollution from natural gas drilling and other sources pose a real threat to Pennsylvania’s streams and rivers, including aquatic life, warned Department of Environmental Protection Secretary John Hanger today. “The treating and disposing of gas drilling brine and fracturing wastewater is a significant challenge for the natural gas industry because of its exceptionally high TDS concentrations,” said Hanger. “Marcellus drilling is growing rapidly and our rules must be strengthened now to prevent our waterways from being seriously harmed in the future.” Hanger pointed to recent examples where TDS impaired streams and affected major sources of drinking water….

To read the full DEP release, click here:
http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/newsroom/14287?id=10349&typeid=1

Gas and drilling not clean choices

Robert Howarth

Natural gas is marketed as a clean fuel with less impact on global warming than oil or coal, a transitional fuel to replace other fossil fuels until some distant future with renewable energy. Some argue that we have an obligation to develop Marcellus Shale gas, despite environmental concerns. I strongly disagree.

Natural gas as a clean fuel is a myth. While less carbon dioxide is emitted from burning natural gas than oil or coal, emissions during combustion are only part of the concern. Natural gas is mostly methane, a greenhouse gas with 72 times more potential than carbon dioxide to warm our planet (per molecule, averaged over the 20 years following emission). I estimate that extraction, transport and combustion of Marcellus gas, together with leakage of methane, makes this gas at least 60 percent more damaging for greenhouse warming than crude oil and similar in impact to coal.

The most recent method of hydro-fracking is relatively new technology, massive in scope and far from clean in ways beyond greenhouse gas emissions. The landscape could be dotted with thousands of drilling pads, spaced as closely as one every 40 acres. Compacted gravel would cover three to five acres for each. New pipelines and access roads crisscrossing the landscape would connect the pads. Ten or more wells per pad are expected. Every time a well is “fracked,” 1,200 truck trips will carry the needed water.

Drillers will inject several million gallons of water and tens of thousands of pounds of chemicals into each well. Some of this mixture will stay deep in the shale, but cumulatively, billions of gallons of waste fluids will surface. Under current law, drillers can use absolutely any chemical additive or waste, with no restrictions and no disclosure. Recent experience in Pennsylvania indicates regular use of toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic substances. Out of 24 wells sampled there, flow-back wastes from every one contained high levels of 4-Nitroquinoline-1-oxide, (according to the New York Department of Environmental Conservation). It is one of the most mutagenic compounds known. Flow-back wastes also contain toxic metals and high levels of radioactivity extracted from the shale, in addition to the materials used by drillers.

Industry tells us that surface and groundwater contamination is unlikely, since gas is deep in the ground and drilling operations are designed to minimize leakage. Nonsense. The technology is new and understudied, but early evidence shows high levels of contamination in some drinking water wells and rivers in other states.

Accidents happen, and well casings and cementing can fail. The geology of our region is complex, and water and materials under high pressure can move quickly to aquifers, rivers and lakes along fissures and fractures. Flow-back waters and associated chemical and radioactive wastes must be handled and stored at the surface, some in open pits and ponds unless government regulation prevents this. What will keep birds and wildlife away from it? What happens downstream if a heavy rain causes the toxic soup to overflow the dam? What happens to these wastes? Adequate treatment technologies and facilities do not exist.

What about government regulation and oversight? The DEC is understaffed,underfunded and has no history with the scale and scope of exploitation now envisioned. Federal oversight is almost completely gone, due to Congress exempting gas development from most environmental laws, including the Safe Drinking Water Act, in 2005.

We can be independent of fossil fuels within 20 years and rely on renewable green technologies, such as wind and solar. The constraints on this are mostly political, not technical. We do not need to sacrifice a healthy environment to industrial gas development. Rather, we need to mobilize and have our region provide some badly needed national leadership toward a sustainable energy future.

Gas drilling using best management practices

From the Resposible Drilling Alliance:
The Texas Oil and Gas Accountability Project has published a best management practices guide for their state’s oil and gas development. This could be a model for state’s newly under pressure for unconventional shale drilling – like Pennsylvania, New York and West Virginia.
According to this guide,

“The challenge facing Texas now is not whether to increase fossil fuel production — energy companies are already on a record-setting pace as they accelerate development.
Rather, the challenge facing us today is how to protect our landowner rights, clean water, air and public health in the face of rapid energy development…


To read the article , click here:

http://earthworksaction.org/publications.cfm?pubID=444

To read the publication on best oil & gas development practices in Texas, click here: http://earthworksaction.org/pubs/Drill_Right_Texas_FINAL.pdf

New gas drilling website for North Central PA

Here is a link to a great new site that is keeping tabs on most everything going on in North Central PA in regards to the gas drilling. Definitely add this one to your bookmarks.

http://northcentralpa.com/category/category/gas-drilling